It’s Our Birthday – Party Favors For Everyone!!

Photo credit: Flicky user camnjeanaccess We’re 10 years old and positively giddy about it! To celebrate, we are giving out gifts throughout the year! We cordially invite you to our upcoming webinar, Foundations of Social Media, Oct. 19th, 1-2pm ET. This free event is open to everyone — Darim members and those who are not yet members. Click here to register and enjoy this taste of Darim as our guest!* The celebration continues with two more complimentary webinars: our November 3rd event featuring Allison Fine, co-author of The Networked Nonprofit (register here!*), and our January 11th event with the creative team behind Shalom Sesame (register here!*). Sign up for one, two, or all three – but hurry – space is limited!* *Can’t make these webinars? They will be recorded and available to the public; no need to register in advance, we’ll post the links on our blog. Check in for more goodies throughout the year! A very special thank you to our members for being such an important part of our community! As one of our gifts to you, we’re excited to announce our new Open Office Hours program. Drop by for free advice and schmoozing with Darim staff. Click here for our full list of Fall/Winter Events. These webinars are free to all staff and lay leadership of Darim Online member organizations. Not yet a member? Find out more and join us today. Feel free to be in touch with any questions or comments at learningnetwork@darimonline.org

Rabbinic Search and Congregational Survey Examples – Temple De Hirsch Sinai, Seattle, WA

Thank you to Temple De Hirsch Sinai for sharing these two thoughtful surveys with the Darim community.   These surveys show the value of a clear, community focused cover letter, that articulates how the leadership values community input, and what will be done with the input given.  Temple De Hirsch Sinai followed up these surveys by mirroring back what they learned to the community, and sharing the amazingly high response rate.

Brit Lashon HaTov — Covenant of Good Speech

Brit Lashon HaTov originally was written by Congregation B’nai Jeshurun (New York City) under the guidance of Rabbi Felicia Sol. Their goal, and ours, is to foster the kind of constructive communication that will truly enable our shul to be a Kehillah Kedoshah: a sacred community. Specifically, this covenant addresses an aspiration that we (like our brothers and sisters at B’nai Jeshurun – "thoughtful, creative, committed, sometimes boisterous, and often opinionated") speak, write, meet, email, and phone each other in ways that demonstrate tolerance and respect.

"Everyone is created in G!d's Image." (Genesis 1:27)

* Invite and encourage everyone's participation.
* Assume the best intentions on the part of your listener.
* Do not engage in lashon hara – gossip, rumor mongering, slander.

"Everyone has a place in the Torah." (Sefat Emet on Parashat Bamidar)

* Seek to understand others' opinions before yours is understood.
* Work to gain insights from views other than your own.

"Disagree for the sake of Heaven." (Pirke Avot 5:19)

* Seek to clarify misunderstandings productively.
* Ask a factual question to determine if your assumptions are correct before deciding there is a problem.
* Treat your conversational partner as you would want to be treated.

"There is a time to keep silent and a time to speak." (Ecclesiastes 3:7)

* Greet questions with a moment of silence to give everyone ample time to formulate a thoughtful response.
* Communicate your own thoughts and speak for yourself, not for other people.
* Understand the roles and responsibilities that congregants, staff and rabbis have in a particular matter so there is real clarity about who is responsible for making a decision.
* Seek to understand when it is time to keep silent.

"Words are powerful" (Proverbs 18:21)

* Appreciate the spirit and passion of our community as it is reflected in diverse opinions.
* Strive towards listening and hearing each other as members of a holy community–

  • In public meetings;
  • In community forms;
  • In havurot;
  • In classes;
  • In email;
  • On the phone;
  • At Temple; and
  • V'al kol Yisrael, v'al kol yoshvei teyvel.

 

Although we strive to keep this covenant, sometimes we fall short. We try to recognize those times and apologize to those we have harmed. We try again. We are human.